Tools and Resources[ Show all or clear results ]

Recorded webinars and presentations

Learning Community
Resources associated with CAI Learning Community
Presentation/Webinar
Recorded webinars and presentations
Video
CRP related video, movie
CAI Webinar: Challenging Conversations with Patients and Families

Challenging Conversations with Patients and Families presented by Dr. Tim McDonald

Communicating with patients and families following unexpected patient harm can be challenging even in optimal conditions; it is a learned skill. Taking into consideration factors such as socio-economic status, religion, cultural preferences, marital status, sexual orientation and gender identity is important to communicating effectively. This webinar covers methods successfully employed by healthcare institutions to recognize, plan for, and communicatate effectively in complex situations and with special groups.

Learning Objectives

After completing this webinar, attendees will be able to…

1. Demonstrate recognition of situations that require advanced techniques for communicating unexpected patient outcomes;

2. Utilize communication enactments in conducting ongoing training in these complex situations within their organizations.


Learning Community
Resources associated with CAI Learning Community
Presentation/Webinar
Recorded webinars and presentations
Video
CRP related video, movie
CAI Webinar: CRPs: Why the insurance industry hasn’t embraced them . . . and why it should

CRPs: Why the insurance industry hasn’t embraced them . . . and why it should presented by Richard Boothman, JD

The driving ideas behind CRPs continue to draw interest and debate, now twenty years after Steve Kraman and Ginny Hamm published their Lexington, KY VA experience with “Extreme Honesty”.  After more than 17 years, the University of Michigan continues to draw attention transparent with their “Michigan Model”, the most successful and longest continual example of a principled, and proactive approach to patients injured in unexpected clinical outcomes.  After years of balking at abandoning “deny and defend” more health systems around the country and around the world are exploring the transition, but a skeptical insurance industry continues to hold back and sometimes, frustrate the desires of their insureds to move in this direction.  Why?  Is the industry’s skepticism well-founded and prudent?  Or is it missing a valuable opportunity?

Rick Boothman, the architect of the “Michigan Model” will initiate a long-deserved discussion into this topic.  His experience suggests that there are multiple insurance advantages in the CRP approach and the insurance industry should rethink old beliefs, practices and prejudices and embrace this model.

Outline

  1. Insurance 101 – a dummy’s guide to the construct
  2. True CRPs – the essential elements and how the model differs from “deny and defend”
  3. What holds the insurance industry back from jumping on board?
  4. What is the insurance industry missing and why should it matter?

Learning Objectives

  • That too many equate CRPs only with selective, early resolution of potential and asserted claims – what are the essential elements that distinguish a true CRP from established, traditional risk management practices?
  • What are the unique outcomes of a CRP and why do they matter?
  • Why a CRP better serves the interests of healthcare insureds?
  • What unique consequences of a CRP would benefit the insurance industry especially?

Learning Community
Resources associated with CAI Learning Community
Presentation/Webinar
Recorded webinars and presentations
Video
CRP related video, movie
CAI Webinar: Responding to Large Scale Adverse Events

Webinar presented by Dr. Tom Gallagher on Thursday, June 6, 2019

Large-scale adverse events, situations in which a breakdown in care has affected multiple (sometimes thousands) of patients, pose significant challenges for institutions related to responding in ways that inform potentially affected patients without unduly alarming them and managing the follow-up. This webinar will highlight lessons learned from the field around responding effectively to adverse events, as well as key unanswered questions.

Learning objectives:

  1. Describe the diversity of large-scale adverse events, and how responding to these events differs from managing adverse events that affect individual patients
  2. List the key elements of an effective response to a large-scale adverse events and the tools that are currently available to assist with this process
  3. Critique an actual large-scale adverse event patient notification letter and press release, and articulate opportunities for improvement in these documents.

Streamed live on May 6, 2015 Clinicians encounter many stressors during their careers, none more significant than a difficult patient event that results in harm. Acknowledging that clinicians make seldom use of traditional support services, leading health centers across the US are pioneering Peer Support Programs that make available a trained and compassionate network of peers who can reach out and provide 1:1 support to a clinician experiencing stress.

In this live video event, we are honored to host the leading authority in the field, Dr. Jo Shaprio of Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, in conversation with Dr. Bryan Bohman, physician leader of Stanford Medicine’s Peer Support Program, to explore the following questions:

• What is motivating leading institutions to establish Peer Support Programs?
• How do Peer Support Programs work? How do they differ from existing support services?
• How effective are they? What do the data say?
• What best practices have emerged?
• What challenges need to be overcome?

The Risk Authority – Stanford, in partnership with Aon Risk Solutions, Lockton UK and MedPro Group invite you to participate in this exciting opportunity to learn about and explore Peer Support Programs from leading experts in the field.

Read more here.